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PWM Sinewave 5kva Inverter

The post discusses a 5kva PWM sinewave inverter circuit using compact ferrite core transformer. The idea was requested by Mr. Javeed.

Technical Specifications


Dear sir, would you please modify its output with PWM source and facilitate to make use such an inexpensive and economical design to World wide needy people like us? Hope You will consider my request. Thanking you.Your affectionate reader.

The Design

In one of my previous post I introduced a ferrite core based 5kva inverter circuit, but since it is a square wave inverter it cannot be used with the various electronic equipment, and therefore its application may be restricted to only with the resistive loads.

However, the same design could be converted into a PWM equivalent sine wave inverter by injecting a PWM feed into the low side mosfets as shown in the following diagram:


PWM Sinewave 5kva Inverter



The SD pin of IC IRS2153 is mistakenly shown connected with Ct, please be sure to connect it with the ground line.

Suggestion: the IRS2153 stage could be easily replaced with IC 4047 stage, in case the IRS2153 seems difficult to obtain.

As we can see in the above PWM based 5kva Inverter circuit, the design is exactly similar to our earlier original 5kva inverter circuit, except the indicated PWM buffer feed stage with the low side mosfets of the H-bridge driver stage.

The PWM feed insertion could be acquired through any standard PWM generator circuit using IC 555 or by using transistorized astable multivibrator.

For more accurate PWM replication, one can also opt for a Bubba oscilator PWM generator for sourcing the PWM with the above shown 5kva sinewave inverter design.

The construction procedures for the above design is not different to the original design, the only difference being the integration of the BC547/BC557 BJT buffer stages with the low side mosfets of the full bridge IC stage and the PWM feed into it.

Simpler Alternative


A little inspection proves that actually the upper stage does not need to be so complex.

The 310V DC generator circuit could be build using any other alternate oscillator based circuit. An example design is shown below where a half bridge IC IR2155 is employed as the oscillator in a push pull manner.

low side mosfet chopping pwm


Again, there's no specific design that may be necessary for the 310V generator stage, you can try any other alternative as per your preference, some common examples being, IC 4047, IC 555, TL494, LM567 etc.

Inductor Details for the above 310V to 220V Ferrite Transformer

ferrite inverter coil details



Need Help? Please leave a comment, I'll get back soon with a reply!




Comments

  1. Never ending thanks to respected Swagatam Majumdar, for the prompt response for requested modification of 5kva ferrite core square wave to PWM sine wave inverter and it is like a boon to the World wide people.

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  2. Thank you for all your informations that gives for free.please can you explain the circuit convert three phase ac 400V to dc by using three level PWM to control dc motor.

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  3. PWM is not required for converting AC to DC, it can be done using a 6 diode bridge rectifier

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  4. any circuit I choose to use for a PWM feed has to send 15 volts to the PWM section of this circuit? in other words I couldnt use a micro controller since It would only send out 5v? I asked because I was thinking of using the arduino to generate a pwm and feed to this circuit.

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  5. OR doesnt it have to be something like a 555 oscilator cricuit I doubt that sends out 15v

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  6. Good evening, I have been following your post for the past few years now really impressed.
    I want to make a request can u please help with a 12vdc 1000w or 1500w pwm power inverter circuit diagram that has been test with details on d transformer based on number of turns and gauge size cos I still find d transformer stuff a little bit difficult will appreciate if it can be fully automated as regards to charging and changeover sections. Thanks in anticipation.

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  7. for a 5V PWM you may have to change the configuration a bit.

    in that case the NPN/PNP BJTs will need to be arranged as done for this design:

    https://homemade-circuits.com/2013/04/how-to-modify-square-wave-inverter-into.html

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  8. yes 555 PWM will also do in conjunction the above linked configuration

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  9. Thanks very much, If time permits I'll surely do the needful and post it soon with the results

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  10. So what I would have to do for the 5v pwm is tie the emmiters of both npn together then send to one side of the gate for the fets then tie pnp's togther and send those to the other side of the Fet gates then connect the collectors through some 1k resistors t the source of the Fets and Pwm input feed, then use a capacitor to connect from the base of the transistors to the collectors like a 680pf?

    I wanted a good Pwm signal to feed the circuit because I would like to run sensative circuits with it would the 555 be the best to feed it or would you recommend the bubla oscillator or the 556 oscillator

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  11. yes can do it in that way or you may also use a BC547 buffer stage with the Arduino output and feed the 15V to the NPN/PNP stage via this BC547 buffer, without changing the above shown configuration.

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  12. so in other words I could use (2) bc547 and use the 2 output pins from the arduino and connect them to the base of the transistors then apply a 15v soruce to the collects or the 2 transistors and then send the emitters to the Pwm input feed of this circuit?

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  13. two inputs are not required, a single PWM applied to the base of a BC547 will do.

    sorry it should BC557 not BC547...with its collector connected with the collectors of the NPN/PNP buffer stage.
    the the emitter of the BC557 will connect with the 15V DC

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  14. ok should It be connected like this since its 1 bc557 and then send the next pwm leg from the arduino to 15v pwm lead

    https://www.dropbox.com/s/zxhe0mysc23kiig/pwm%20inverter%20circuit.png?dl=0

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  15. the link is not opening, not sure why, may be my internet is slow.... I'll check it out some other time.

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  16. OK, now it has opened,

    the red line will connect with the arrow marked "15V PWM", you have connected it with the ground line which is incorrect

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  17. OK so emitter to 15v pin and collector to 15v pwm pin and 1 leg of arduino to the base of the transistor, where will. I connect the other leg of the arduino after I made those connections?

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  18. good afternoon my dear friend first of all sorry for my bad English, following let me congratulate you most excellent work in the field good I tell him that the circuit is very interezante and I would like to build I have some basic knowledge but I have a couple of questions first; if the voltage from the source and directed to the H-bridge is 300 to 310v as does the sitema down that such a high voltage to 120v required that would be my case ?, second stage PMW15v where you recommend placing a pnp trasistor, which type of pulses have to get there? I mean pulse would have to be a square wave at 60 Hz from pin 3 of a 555 or would have to be another type of wave and if haci could produce such a wave thanks in advance

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  19. yes that's correct.

    PWM is always from a single source, not from two sources, so you cannot have two outputs for the PWMs from the Arduino.

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  20. thank you cadera22,

    yes it can be operated with a 120V input also. no changes would be required.

    the PWM cold be acquired from any standard 555 IC PWM circuit and fed directly to the point marked "15V PWM"

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  21. ..adjusting the PWM duty cycle would enable you to optimize the RMS of the output.

    the frequency of the PWM could be set to around 200Hz

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  22. you are saying PWM is always from a single source for example from pin 3 of a 555 am I correct?

    But probably I dont understand something because in serval examples I thought pwm came from 2 outputs high and low pwm feeds for example:

    https://homemade-circuits.com/2013/10/pure-sine-wave-inverter-circuit-using.html

    your 4047 inverter circuit with pwm out from pin 10 and pin 11 isnt that considered 2 output pwm? If I was to use it to send signal to the 5kva pwm input section I assume I would need no modification once I power the circuit from 15v.

    But in the case of the arduino I have a similar 2 pin pwm out in which I would just pick one pin to send the the base of the buffer transistor but I wouldnt have anywhere to connect the other pin, ill share the image of the schematic.

    https://www.dropbox.com/s/fe4txjsgw6rglx1/arduino_h_bridge.gif?dl=0

    Hopefully you can clear up some details about that for me. on the other hand I now realize this code probably wouldnt work either because what frequency pwm should I be sending to the 5kva circuit I have seen you commented above saying 200khz but this arduino code is 60hz but I still want to understand how it would work even if it was the correct frequency.

    I just wanted to use it because of the temperature controlled fan and led indicators for the sensors, but if it doesnt work out, what would you recommend me to use for a clean signal generator would the tl072 generator found on your forum be best or probably the 556 generator, because I dont want a pwm sqaure wave I want a good modified wave or a puresine wave.

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  23. The two inputs from an oscillator is used for implementing the basic operation for any inverter, that is to run it at the required 50 or 60Hz, with a push-pull effect...also called totem pole config.

    PWM is different to the above, it's for chopping the above basic 50Hz into smaller pillars through specific duty cycles which decides the average voltage (RMS) from these chopped 50/60Hz frequency..

    out of the two sources, you can use any one but the frequency will need to be 200Hz or nearby, and should have the PWM adjust facility.

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  24. Ok I understand so since this circuit is already producing its own push and pull it only requires a pwm input to chop the waves up to make a cleaner wave, the only thing I could do to facilitate pwm adjustment using the arduino is to adjust the off and on time delay to match that of a 200hz frequency as I am not good eough yet with programing to write a program to read from a POT and make changes, but thats why I asked which oscilator circuit would be best to implement here to produce pure sinewave or very clean modified wave.

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  25. yes that's correct,
    initially you said that you had Arduino with you therefore I did not suggest you the 555 PWM option , otherwise I would say it's the best approach for the PWM generation

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  26. oh never mind I realized I cant use irfz44n for the output because of the source emitter voltage spec being at 55v. Ill try t see if I can source the 2sk4124

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  27. Google 700v n mosfet, you will probably get plenty of good options.

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  28. I did 2 turns on the primary and 9 turns on the secondary because I wanted to use 24v to power the circuit but for testing purposes I used a ready made adjustable power supply with a regulator so I know its low powered and I used a buck converter to power the Ic I sent 14v to it. On the adjustable power supply I am using only one side since its a dual polarity power supply I am using the positive side, When I power up everything I only get 18v from the transformer at 35khz and the FET at on the power supply board gets hot so I am wondering its the low current from the supply why the voltage is so low even after a while when the power supply gets hot the voltage drops more.

    I only build the high frequency section of the circuit, at the input I used 2 10uf capacitors because I didnt have 20uf capacitors also where the bc547 transistors are I 2 paralleled 3 10ohm resistors to get 3.3ohm because I couldnt get any 2.7 ohm resistors and for FETs I used Irfz44n and I only used 2 of them. I used 4 mur415 diodes because I didnt know what dsb12-06a is I couldnt find that anywhere.

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  29. How did you calculate the 2 turns and the 9 turns and the 24v?? winding a trafo is an extremely critical job which needs either complex calculations or relentless trial and error experiments...if the data is not correctly matched can result in fire and hot devices.

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  30. Well you were the one who told me that in an earlier post either on this threat or the one of the original post without the pwm input I told you if I was going to build it then I would use 24v and I asked how much turns would that be and you said if 5 turns would be 60v then 2 turns would be 24v and I said I would use 110v on the output you had 18 turns so you said 9 turns would be for 110v.

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  31. I tried to give you a rough idea, a starting point from where you could experiment to get the most reasonable value...ultimately it will depend on many things like frequency, winding style, layout of the wiring...all these can affect the performance drastically. If you know how to optimize then it can be easy otherwise you will keep getting strange results from the coil.
    I have written many articles on buck boost circuits referring to which might give you an idea regarding how to design and optimize these inductors for a particular application.

    in short you must try adjusting 3 basic things which are: frequency, number of turns, and input voltage until you get the right balance between them

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  32. Ok so to change the frequency I could keep changing the resistor or the capacitors at pins 2 and 3? If so is there any values that I shouldnt go above or below? also I am using an adjustable power supply so I will try the voltage ajustment also. But as it reguards to the winding I paid someone to wind the E80 core I bought just the same as how you have it in the article so I am assuming thats ok.

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  33. you can use a pot in place instead of Rt and optimize to see which frequency produces the most effective results, actually you can try a 10k pot instead of the 10k resistor, with a 1K resistor in series.

    I think adjusting the frequency and voltage correctly should be enough to set the circuit correctly for any selected inductor.

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  34. thanks for your good works. pls is the transformer a 60-0-60 /220v ? i have problem with the transformer aspect. thanks

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  35. yes...the transformer is a ferrite core transformer and is designed to work with a 60V input and 220V output

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  36. Hello Sir,
    How can we select the rating of the capacitor for inverter

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  37. Hello Neha, which capacitor? is the one between pin3 and pin4 of the upper IC??

    it will need to be determined using a frequency meter at the output of the IC and through some trial and error.

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  38. Why is there no resistors at the gate of the Fets?

    what about an input inrush current limiting feature could you implement this?

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  39. fets have a common resistor 2k7
    with PWM included there cannot be any inrush current effect

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  40. OK i see, I can never figure out when each Fet needs its own gate resistor that's just it.

    I was going to ask you for some help to integrate some other features to this but I'll try first and get back to you.

    Each time I see a hbridge circuit it seems it can manage the required wattage but what if the fets can't manage it is there a way people parallel fets in a hbridge or would you use a different configuration to drive Fets.

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  41. In the shown diagram the 2k7 is actually not required since the gate voltage is derived from the buffer NPN/PNP, which ensures total safety from transient to the fets, but adding a resistor doesn't harm anything

    you can add parallel mosfets to H-bridge also to increase its capacity

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  42. This looks like how it should be done

    https://www.google.com.jm/search?q=parallel+h+bridge+fet&client=ms-android-sprint-us&biw=360&bih=518&prmd=ivsn&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjH2LaCwJvPAhVLySYKHbO4B9gQ_AUIBygB#imgrc=ATbruZMD4BmYlM%3A


    I'm using 110v can I get the 5kva from those 4 fets only?

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  43. just connect the gate, drain, source of the respective FEts in parallel, that's the standard way of connecting fets in parallel.

    with 110V DC you can easily get 5kv from four FETs provided those are mounted on large heatsinks and air cooled

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  44. I built the high frequency side just now I was getting 35khz but only at 25v not sure if the low voltage is because I was using a multimeter but then I tried to add the bridge rectifier to it but I didn't use the capacitor I just used to 4 diodes and one of the Fet got damaged, is it because I didn't use the diodes?

    The Fets I used were irfz44n

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  45. the voltage will strictly depend on the transformer turn ratio and frequency optimization.

    fets are only responsible for transferring power output, not for fixing voltage levels.

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  46. I understand, but like I was saying everything worked fine I was getting 35khz output but I didnt have the diodes connected, then I soldered up 4 diodes and connected it to the transformers output and the Fets got fried I am wondering what would cause that if its because I didnt add the capacitor along with the diodes or Is it tha I need to build the entire second half of the circuit also, I just wanted to test the high frequency side then connect diodes to read the voltage level then finish the second stage, then build pcb after everything works

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  47. I am assuming that you are referring to the H-bridge FETs

    did you connect a proper load between the 4 FETs?

    what was the voltage after rectification? was it higher than the FET V specs

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  48. if you are referring to the first circuit's FETs then it could be due to a short circuit at the trafo output due to wrong bridge connections...always connect a fuse or a high watt bulb in series with the supply

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  49. Not the H Bridge fets.... I haven't built that side of the circuit as yet, I'm just going on stages.

    I ONLY built the high frequency side and at the output of the transformer i was getting 35Khz. I assumed I couldn't read the voltage accurately because I was using a multimeter which shouldn't be able to read voltages properly at that high frequency.

    So the high frequency circuit works just fine, so what I did was to Solder 4 4amp diodes and I connected the corresponding parts to the output side of the ferrite core transformer so hoping to convert the reading to DC so that I could read it. I didn't have a capacitor to use as a filter so I ONLY had the 4 diodes nothing else then powered up the circuit again. Then immediately a Fet fried (and remember the Fet is in the high frequency circuit).

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  50. bridge connections were correct, I even make it a habbit to place components exactly as it is in the schematics (not that I have to, Im not that much of a newbie but it prevents me from overlooking simple things like that.)

    I changed the fet and tested it again and the same fet fried again and I checked the Zener diode corresponding to it and it was shorted, ill try to replace it and try again.

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  51. the bridge will have no effect as long as it's not loaded, connecting a bridge rectifier without a load is as good as connecting nothing at the output...because the bridge will never conduct unless it's loaded at the output, so I am not sure what caused the issue.

    the above design was built and tested numerous times successfully by Mr. Sherwin, you can read the details in the comment sections of this article

    https://homemade-circuits.com/2014/07/5kva-ferrite-core-inverter-circuit.html

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  52. I always follow your comments I read most of them, but Ill just get the rated parts and test again, I like to make use of what I have to do testing before I build the actual thing, I am using a MCU to add other feature to this project it taking me a while because of work.

    Hopefully I can be one who tested successfully also.

    One thing I am really not sure about and its how many wraps my transformer should have I am currently testing my circuit with 24v input which I have 2 wraps and 9 wraps on the output because I need 110v but when I build the officcial circuit for high power Ill want to use 48v I am assuming that would be about 3+3 turns.

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  53. the other features could be added only after the basic inverter is successfully completed.

    the turns will depend on the frequency and the input voltage which could be solved by formulas or with some trial and error by modifying the existing winding data

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  54. Ok then also when wrapping the primary is it important to wrap the first set of turns then isulate, then wrap the secondary turns, insulate, then wrap final primary turn?

    for example wrapping the 5+5 turns, what if I wrapped 5 then I insulate it then wrap 5 again, insulate and then wrap the secondary over it would that give similar results?

    I ask these questions to gain more knowledge, not that I have to ask them since it takes up tour time.

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  55. even though there is no load at the output of the bridge, shouldn't I still be able to get the voltage out by reading with the Volt meter?

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  56. It is not compulsory to sandwich the secondary inside the primary, but it is supposed to give better results than winding one over the other.

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  57. without load the voltage reading should be much higher than with load.

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  58. Hi,

    This looks to be very interesting idea. I was comparing this sinewave to your original dsign and noticed that the input voltage in your original design is 60V but in this sinewave design the input voltage is 90V (in the circuit diagrams). I just wanted to confirm that if I want to use 60V input with sinewave design, do I need to modify any of the components?

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  59. Hi, thanks,

    the input voltage can be anything, the input voltage is relevant only to the mosfets and the transformer, so these two parameters needs to be adjusted correctly as per the selected input voltage level....

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  60. Hello dear sir I enjoy reading your posts and explanations you are a blessing thank you
    I would like to ask can I use a 48v supply instead of 90v that shows on the diagram what do I have to change so the circuit works thank u

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  61. Hello dear friend and teacher
    I m going to start creating this project
    Only thing I whant to ask is a replacement for DSB12-06A
    And the transformer what specifications should be
    Thank you

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  62. Hello demiliza, you don't have to change for a lower input voltage except the transformer winding which will need to be modified accordingly

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  63. demiliza, sorry I do not know the replacement for this diode since the upper design is not mine....by the way you can replace the upper deign with some other inverter variant, for example using IC 4047 or the following article:

    https://homemade-circuits.com/2013/09/half-bridge-mosfet-driver-ic-irs21531d.html

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  64. Thank you very much for your help I'm very thankfull wishing you all the best

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  65. SIR, I WANT TO KNOW IF IT IS POSSIBLE TO USE AN INVERTER TO CHARGE A 12V BATTERY USING A 12V BATTERY CHARGER AND AT THE SAME TIME USING THE BATTERY TO POWER INVERTER AS A POWER SOURCE

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  66. Good day sir i have a question regarding the transformer i want to use a 12-0-12 center tape instead of the 50-0-50 but stil have a problem on determining the secondary gauge of copper wire i will require to wind the secondary thanks sir

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  67. Olupot, the center tap transformer indicated in the diagram must be a ferrite based trafo and must be designed exactly as suggested in the linked article. by the way it is nowhere mentioned that the ttrafo should be rated at 50-0-50

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  68. thanks sir for the correction but its difficult for me to get a ferrite type of transformer.i have a laminated toroid type of transformer so can i use that one. if yes

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  69. in that case you don't have to make the above design, instead you can try the second concept from the following article

    https://homemade-circuits.com/2013/10/pure-sine-wave-inverter-circuit-using.html

    use more number of mosfets in parallel to achieve the 5kva power, and make sure that the trafo and battery are sufficiently rated to handle this power

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  70. Hi, Please , where is indicate MJE13005 in this schematic, thank you

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  71. there's no MJE13005 in this schematic, where did you read it??

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  72. just above 1uf/25v in the second stage

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  73. please ignore it...it's not used in the circuit.... earlier i had used a BJT stage instead of the 33K resistor for stepping down the high voltage to low DC, but later changed it to a resistor, and forgot to remove the BJT number.

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  74. Is the two pot 10k on pwm stage is used to adjust pwm and output voltage??Thank you?

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  75. yes it can be used for adjusting the output RMS voltage

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  76. Hi Swag,

    I am trying to build a ferrite core transformer inverter for learning purpose. I got an idea to try old computer power supply to get ferrite core transformer and use its 12 0 12 center tapped portion. but as per my understanding this type of transformers need high frequency input ranging between 20 khz to 100 khz so thats not an issue. I can use 4047 or 3525 for that. but issues seems here that I cannot find IR2453 to converter that high freq output to 50hz. Do you know any alternative solution to converter high freq to low freq without any power loss. I studied about 4017 to use as frequency divider but I know that will not fulfill the requirement as we have minimum options for divider integer.

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  77. Hi Saqib,

    yes high frequency will be required for driving a ferrite core trafo.
    The IRS2453 is a full bridge driver IC, and will be necessary if the trafo is a two wire, or if you are intending to use a two wire trafo...but since you have a 12-0-12V trafo you can easily use a 4047 or SG3525 instead, although the efficiency will be slightly less, but it will allow you to start the work without having to wait for a full bridge driver,
    you can find many other options, if you just make search by typing "full bridge driver IC datasheet"

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  78. Nice blog. How is feedback achieved in this inverter? I don't see anything to that regards here.

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  79. feedback can be avoided once the PWM is correctly set as per the required output RMS

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  80. Hi Swag,

    Is there any possibility to use Arduino instead of IRS2453 as High Side H Bridge Mosfets Driver? If yes do you have someone with skills to program arduino that work in this scenario.

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  81. Hi Saqib, Making a Arduino full bridge circuit with 4 N channel mosfets can be quite difficult, from our side it may not be possible at the moment. However related design can be found in the following link using combination of the p and n channel mosfets:

    https://www.homemade-circuits.com/arduino-full-bridge-h-bridge-sinewave-inverter-circuit/

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  82. Hi, mr. Swag, here I am again, now in this post:

    I intend to make an invertaer, preferently with 5KVA (like yours) and this one seems to be very good. I am making a solar power at home using 270 W solar panels, connected to a charger controler MPPT 60 Amps. For bateries, I am actualiy using two bats 12V 200 AMP, and intend to put another tow, in series that makes about 28 volts fully charged and 22 volts whem emptyed. In outher words, I need to make the first parte (oscileator and tranformer) working with this range. Here, in Brasil, home voltages are 110 V / 60 Hz, so I think that secondary needs to be 110 V, or do I need make less than 110 V, since once retified it wil be much more than 110 V (110 * 1.414 in fact)? Resuming, my questions are:
    1 - How do I calculate the transformer for work with 22 to 28 V / 110V ?
    2 - May I use toroidal transformer? In case yes, where i get formulas for calculating?
    3 - Is it possible to creat an feedback circuit for controling voltage acording state of batery (ull or empty);
    4 - Is it dificult to transform the second part in a pure sine wave circuit?

    My best regards,
    Nuno Figueiredo

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  83. Hi Nuno,
    I appreciate your interest and wish you all the best for this project!
    Since it is a ferrite transformer calculating may require some effort, and I personally do not have much experience in designing ferrite transformer, therefore it could be difficult for me to advise regarding the exact calculations.
    For 110V output you must select a 110V transformer only, because after rectification the output is supposed to be 165V roughly, this will be again stepped down through PWM to 110V RMS.

    For the transformer you can refer to the following article, and read Mr Sherwin Baptsta's advise and experience with the construction of the transformer.
    https://www.homemade-circuits.com/5kva-ferrite-core-inverter-circuit/
    Torroidal may not be required for this project since the recommended EE core based transformer will be good enough.
    We can create a feedback control and I may assist you with it once you have finished testing the basic inverter circuit successfully.
    The rectangular PWM chopping could be replaced with an SPWM and then filtered with LC stages for achieving a full sine wave output...we will discuss this elaborately once the basic design is completed by you

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  84. Thank you for reply.
    I intend to make this inverter. First I need to see if all componente are avaible here, specialy EE core ferrite.
    Oportunatly I'll return.
    Best Regards.

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  85. Sure Nuno, but please proceed with caution since this project is quite difficult and recommended only for the advanced users.

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  86. nice blog , intend to buid the circuit replacing sk4124 with IGBT cmd150dy-12nf or skkh727/12e wich i have, what are the changes that i to make so that i can use any of those IGBT's

    how is short circuit protection achieved in thes circuit

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  87. Thanks jack, you can replace the mosfets with IGBT without any changes in the circuit because IGBT gate work quite similarly to mosfets.

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  88. Pls the part tagged LOAD is that the output point.
    Secondly, what is the ratings of the mosfet close to the MUR415 diodes

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  89. Yes the load is the output where the appliance may be connected.
    the mosfets can be any N channel mosfet as per your load wattage specifications. 4 on each channel are shown which is not compulsory. If your load wattage is not significantly high, you can use single mosfets per channel.

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  90. This really help thanks
    Do not forget the parts list I requested for too.
    The transformer should it be 50-0-50 center tabbed?
    Once again thanks

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  91. It's my pleasure.
    You can probably help me by writing down the parts list roughly from the diagram. I'll it check it amend it further before updating the finalized list.

    The transformer winding will be as per the input supply, if you are using 60V then may be 50-0-50 can be a good starting point, i do not have the exact data.

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  92. Thanks swag for your previous replies I'm almost through with the construction.
    The battery charger, how do I connect it to the main circuit or can the board also charge the battery?

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  93. Thanks Jeffery, For manual charging you can use an SPDT switch, connect the center pin with battery positive, while the other two outer pins can go to charger positive, and to the inverter positive line respectively. When charging is required turn the switch towards the battery charger output, and when inverter operation is required turn the switch to the other side.

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