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Illuminating DRL and Turn Lights with Single Common Lamp

The post discusses a simple relay changeover circuit for managing a sustained power to the connected battery via a solar panel, and a mains operated SMPS power supply. The idea was requested by Ms Rina.

Technical Specifications

I would like to know how the circuit looks like for the problem that you have explained previously. But the application is little bit different.

There are three parameters:

The solar panel, The battery, And the AC/DC adapter. During day time the solar panel charges the battery and also stays connected to a 1hp air conditioner, pendaflour tube and a computer so that it can be lit through solar panel.

At night, all 3 appliances gets automatically connected to the battery.

And during overcast conditions or in absence of sunlight, if the battery voltage drops, the battery gets connected to the adapter so that it is able to get charged from the AC/DC source....

Thank you in advance Sir.

Rina

Illuminating DRL and Turn Lights with Single Common Lamp

The Design


The proposed solar panel, battery and mains relay changeover circuit as shown above may be understood with the help of the following explanation:

Referring to the figure, we can see that the solar panel power is fed to a charger controller, preferably an MPPT circuit, and also to an SPDT relay coil (via a 78L12 voltage regulator)

This relay remains activated as long as the solar panel voltage is persistent during the day, and as soon as darkness falls, the relay contacts change over and switch the mains adapter voltage with the charger controller unit.

An inverter battery can be seen connected across the output of the charger controller, which is continuously charged through the controller either through the panel voltage or the Mains SMPS voltage, depending upon the day/night or overcast conditions.

The battery can also be seen directly and permanently connected to an associated inverter which is able to receive the battery power throughout the day and also during the night time.

However since the battery is consistently kept in the charging mode via the solar panel or the SMPS, its lower discharge level is never reached and the battery finds itself always in topped-up condition, and supplying a 24/7 power to the connected loads via the inverter output mains.

Need Help? Please leave a comment, I'll get back soon with a reply!




Comments

  1. Thank you very much sir for helping me out. Really appreciate it. I'll try to build and run the circuit and will let you know if I have any question regarding to this circuit. Thanks Sir. :)

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  2. Hi sir its me again i have a question regarding solar panel. It is possible to charge the solar panel during night time via the LED light since it is 90% effecient than any other conventional light bulb. I have already tried it with a 12v 25 watts solar panel I just put one pieces led light into it. when i meter it with a voltmeter i just got reading of approximately 12v. But i did not try it to charge that voltage that generates the light from solar panel to charge a battery due to the lack of some equipments. So i am just wondering if it is possible to use a led light to light the solar panel during night time because we know already that solar panel only works during a day time.

    Hope you will find some idea...

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  3. Sir its me again can you give me an idea about of what is SMPS adapter because i Sm new in electronics i dont have enough knowledge about that. And also how many amp is the 12v zener diode on the above circuit?

    Thanks...

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  4. Hi Angelous, no that's not possible...

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  5. ...and there's no way to generate electricity from a solar panel with LED light at night

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  6. Angelous, SMPS stands for switch mode power supply...you can use the search box on top for searching any relevant keyword based article that you may desire..

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  7. the zener is 1/2 watt rated....zeners are rated by volts and watt

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  8. Sir, I would like to know whether the circuit is cut-off automatically when it is fully charged by the solar panel? If not, how can I make some modifications to the circuit so that when the battery is full, the power supply from the solar will be cut off?

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  9. And sorry Sir for asking this, for the 3 appliances (1hp air cond., pendaflour tube, computer), 1200W is needed approximately. Are you recommending the 36V/15A solar panel and 12V/200Ah based on the problem or you just assume to use it? Thank you Sir.

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  10. Rina, I have indicated an MPPT charger controller in the design, which will have a built in over charge controller stage in it

    If you are not using an MPPT then you could try the second circuit from the following article:

    https://homemade-circuits.com/2011/12/how-to-make-simple-low-battery-voltage.html

    however the above link is only for cut off purpose it does not include a voltage regulator.

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  11. the supply parameters are assumed only...you might need to change the parameters substantially to suit your requirements.

    preferably use an 18V panel rated at 30 amps panel...and a similar SMPS device for the mains operation...this will help to simplify the design

    battery can be a a 12V 200 ah or 500ah for the required load, depending on the required back up time

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  12. Angelous, actually there are many such projects which you might be able to make but since I have little idea regarding your skill and knowledge level so it could be difficult for me to suggest...you can yourself search for a suitable one which might within the reach of your understanding.

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  13. Well, i really understand sir and Its Okay..

    Thanks for Your Advice.

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  14. Sir do you have an idea bout the self-generated cellphone charger or free energy cellphone charger? I've just watched it on youtube and it seems do intetesting. But the problem is the circuit is really hard to find, i have already searched for it but it still hard to find. So i am hoping that you may have idea on the said project. I will attach the link below for you to watch the video.

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  15. Angelous, The video which you saw is a FAKE video, and there are 100s of them uploaded in YT... free energy concept through motors is so far an unfeasible concept.

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  16. ohh... really sir

    well thanks sir Ive learned a lot.

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  17. Good day sir, I've been following your tutorials/guides and they've been of great help to me. I designed a 500W inverter using SG3524 but it was only able to power my DVD player and my mobile phone charger...and the 60W incandescent bulb in my room flickers continuously. I don't know what the problem is. And secondly I'll be grateful if you can help me with the circuit diagram of a 12v/10Amp solar charge controller and 5KW or 7KW inverter with automatic changeover, overload fuse, polarity alarm, low battery cutoff, battery charger and a remote controlled power on/off. As well as the components and where to buy them online because I'm based in Nigeria. Pls forgive me if I am asking for too much

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  18. thanks bobnathan, if your inverter is actually rated at 500 watt then you should check the battery, the battery must be rated at least 50 to 100 AH for satisfying higher loads.

    Actually I already have the requested circuit in this blog but not as a combined unit rather explained separately through different articles......if time permits i'll try to produce a single combined unit of the same.

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  19. Okay… I'll check the blog for those circuits. For the 500W inverter I used a 75AH car battery and two pairs of IRFP 450 MOSFET's

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  20. the battery looks fine, then it's not the battery rather it could be the inverter itself, which could be either wrongly set to prevent higher loads over 60 watt from operating or may be the inverter is simply not rated at 500 watt

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  21. Hello Sir, for the automatic switching operation between solar and main grid, is there any problem occurred with the circuit such as voltage drop? can you highlight the issue. Thank you Sir.

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  22. Hello Rina,
    No there will be no such issues.

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  23. Hallo sir,
    In the evening instead of switching stright to Mains AC suppy I desire that the battery discharge for a while and take my home load...Say 50% of battery can be used before the relay switches to main supply.What changes would be required?Maybe an opamp with a 9v zener at inverting terminal to allow battery to discharge to that level and battery positive connected to non inverting and output through a inverter to lower terminal of relay...I am guessing from the other circuits but would not be able to guess actual design... Kindly suggest Vinay Jambhali vinayjambhali@gmail.com

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  24. Hello Vinay, yes opamp can be used, but 9V can be too low for a 12V battery. If you intend to discharge it 50% then 11.5V is enough. After charging from solar panel, your battery could be around 12.6V, which can be used until it reaches 11.5V

    you can try the second circuit from the following link

    https://homemade-circuits.com/2011/12/how-to-make-simple-low-battery-voltage.html

    you will need to connect the relay contacts with the house load.

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  25. Sir, my mercury inverter of model: radiant 2000 stopped working after a thunder strike... I've tested as many components as I can and they all seem good to me except that both the - and + terminal of the battery input reads live when connected with AC and it makes a kind of noise too. What could be the problem sir?. Thanks you. And I forgot it is 24V DC/1200W inverter

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  26. bobnathan, it's mostly never possible to check the components while they are on the PCB as the readings would be incorrect, how can you confirm the parts the OK??

    you'll need to check the stages by isolating them from each other and running them individually

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  27. i love this great work you are doing,weldone.
    My inverter is sukam 1.5kva and it has an inbuilt charging system connected directly to battery terminals.Do u know how i can use this circuit for same purpose?

    thanks i appreciate

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  28. thanks, you can skip the MPPT block and connect the battery terminals directly with the diodes of the solar panel and the smps adapter.

    the smps adapter can eb compared with your inverter charging output...disconnect it from your inverter battery and configure it with a relay as shown in the diagram, and also connect the inverter with the battery as per the diagram. This will hopefully enable you to get the expected results...

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  29. Dear sir ,
    I have a problem regarding this circuit i do not have mppt controller but a 10 amp PWM controller kindly suggest me how can i use pwm controller in this circuit and explained me the modified changes that is essential for the circuit like adapter and panel .
    Thank you for the concern

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  30. Dear Shehzad, you can use any form of charge controller in the indicated position, MPPT is not strictly required.

    panel and the SMPS adapter will depnd on the battery specification, specify those and I'll try to figure out the rest

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  31. Hi Swagath,

    Solar charger (MPPT or PMW) these devices only can be charge the battery via Solar panel? or can I use it normal charger circuit? I mean instead of solar panel can I input 12V DC power from a transformer, it will charge the battery?

    Regards.

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  32. Hi Paaker,

    A solar panel output is nothing but an ordinary DC similar to what we get from a battery or a good AC to DC power supply circuit...so definitely you can replace the solar panel with a transformer based power supply unit...

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  33. Ok.

    Pls Kindly check the attached image. this is what I wish to do. please tell me if it ok or not.
    http://i66.tinypic.com/zlif8.png

    Manual Toggle switch to select the incoming voltage for Solar charger control.

    Regards.

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  34. that's perfect according to me!

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